Health & Safety

Stay Safe at Work Today and Every Day

Our Health & Safety Management System Corporate Bank is designed to help ensure all employees of Yukon Government have the tools they require to stay safe at work.

Purpose:

This Safe Work Practice (SWP) will provide YG employees with a set of guidelines or “Do’s and Don’ts” that have been developed to mitigate hazards associated with this work task, as identified through your workplace hazard identification process. All YG employees performing this work task are required to be trained, knowledgeable and competent.

Guidelines:


Do:

a)    Wear the appropriate clothing and footwear (non-slipping) for the weather conditions

b)    If possible, inform someone that you will be doing snow removal

c)    Visually inspect the shovel for wear and tear, and if more than one shovel is available, find the one that meets both your needs and that of the task at hand (i.e., smaller faced shovels used for lifting or moving heavy, wet snow)

d)    Take smaller steps when both shoveling and walking

e)    Push or shovel only manageable amounts of snow

f)     Use your legs – and not your back, when lifting snow

g)    Shovel snow into piles at a close distance to your body

h)   Spread either salt, sand or some other traction substance on the cleared area to reduce ice formation and potential slips, trips and falls

i)     Return shovels to their original locations when finished shoveling

j)      Inform supervisor of any outstanding snow or ice conditions not attended to


Do Not:

a)    Do not twist or strain when carrying a load of snow in your shovel

b)    Do not block ramps or exits when shoveling

c)    Do not use an underhand grip position with the shovel, as this can potentially weaken or injure your wrist when shoveling

d)    Do not overdo it – if you feel yourself getting sore, tired or too cold, trade off with someone else or take a break


General:

If exposed to vehicles or traffic when clearing snow at your workplace, be sure to wear a high visibility vest to make drivers aware of your location, especially in areas or during times with little to low light.